The Uniting States of Eurasia

I have, these last few months, been documenting the current state of geopolitics — specifically the growing isolation of the West, the ditching of the dollar as the global reserve currency, the growing unity between the authoritarian Eurasian nations, and the brewing storm in the middle east between Israel and Iran.

Now another piece of the puzzle falls into place.

From The Sun:

Pakistan yesterday warned Britain to help stop the American “Drone Wars” that are slaughtering hundreds of its innocent civilians.

The nuclear power chillingly declared it “has the means” to retaliate unless the carnage ceases.

Pakistan’s High Commissioner to Britain Wajid Shamsul Hasan told The Sun in an exclusive interview that his country’s relations with America are at their lowest ebb.

He said: “Patience is definitely reaching exhaustion levels.” Mr Hasan said Pakistan backs the War on Terror waged by Britain and the US.

But he urged PM David Cameron to condemn US drone attacks on al-Qaeda and Taliban training camps in the north west of his country — dubbing them as “war crimes” and “little more than state executions”.

Tough-talking Mr Hasan also declared Pakistan would have no choice but to support Iran if “aggressive” Israel attacks it

This isn’t a joke. This isn’t “just rhetoric”. This is Eurasia uniting to keep America out, to trample American and Israeli interests, and to dominate geopolitics. Let me be clear: this is the systemic and complete failure of 40 years of American foreign and domestic policy

From Zbigniew Brzezinski’s Grand Chessboard (pp. 31):

[H]ow America manages Eurasia is critical. A power that dominates Eurasia would control two of the world’s three most advanced and economically productive regions. A mere glance at the map also suggests that control over Eurasia would almost automatically entail Africa’s subordination, rendering the Western Hemisphere and Oceania (Australia) geopolitically peripheral to the world’s central continent. About 75 per cent of the world’s people live in Eurasia, and most of the world’s physical wealth is there as well, both in its enterprises and underneath its soil. Eurasia accounts for about three-fourths of the world’s known energy resources.

With Eurasia uniting around Russia and China (exemplified by their joint veto on Syria) it seems like America — stripped by globalisation of her productive base, and thus dependent on Eurasian resources and manufacturing — is about to lose the colossal free lunch she has enjoyed since the 1970s. And American aggression to impose its will on the Eurasian powers is becoming less and less viable. America is not only deeply in debt to her enemies, but would find herself gravely injured by any future trade war.

Of course, there is a path forward for America. But it is not the path desired by the current administration:

A sensible American plan going forward would recognise [these issues], and would be developing the means and the infrastructure to end America’s free lunch — specifically, through redeveloping American manufacturing capacity and supply chains, and scaling back America’s role as global policeman. Unfortunately, I see no such thing from government, and very little from private industry. America is clinging onto the old foreign policy doctrines — that if America is powerful enough, and if it can retain its role as global hegemon and world policeman, then it will always be free to consume a chunk of the rest of the world’s production and resources, because its currency will forever be the global reserve. But that simply isn’t true — Russia and China have already ditched the dollar for bilateral trade.

But this is bigger than just the implications for America. We are moving into a new era; a new world order, a multi-polar (bipolar? tripolar? apolar?) world.

What will this mean for the rest of the world and all her citizens? I have very little clue — but hopefully not world war, or trade war, or proxy war. Hopefully America will gracefully accept the end of American hegemony. Hopefully the new powers will be gracious and fair toward the old ones. Hopefully the new world will be friendlier to liberty, friendlier to freedom.

But given that the new bloc’s powers all exude authoritarian rhetoric, I doubt it.

Most concerningly, regular readers will be aware that Pakistan are the second Eurasian power to pledge military support to Iran in the case of an Israeli attack. These nations know the score:  the last hope for American imperial hegemony is to bring the Arab Spring to Moscow, Beijing, Tehran, and Islamabad.

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66 thoughts on “The Uniting States of Eurasia

  1. Is it me, or is Hillary Clinton a real whiny demanding bitter women. Do you think she would get Diplomat’s noses out of joint?

    How will the USA negotiate its fall from grace, without losing face with her in charge?

    • I don’t think it’s a problem local to Hillary Clinton. I think it’s attitudinal. I don’t see any difference in policy or rhetoric between Hillary and Condoleezza and Albright.

  2. Aziz you are absolutely correct about the gravity of this situation. I would add that there has never been a change of this magnitude without a wider war.

  3. I think Eurasia will not fully unite but rather be divided into several trade blocs, like it did in the 1800s and early 1900s. (Sterling bloc, Franc bloc, etc.) Europe will be divided into an EUR or D-Mark bloc consisting of Western European countries and a Ruble bloc consisting of CIS. China and SE Asia would form the Yuan bloc. I think USD will still be the regional reserve currency for the Americas and Trans-Pacific belt (Australia, NZ, Korea, Japan, etc.) but I’m not sure on it. I’m also puzzled by the future positions of India, the Middle East and Africa. We shall see.

    What we should remember is that Eurasia and even inside Europe and Asia respectively has histories of numerous bloodsheds. They just can’t fully integrate.

  4. So refreshing to read yet another sane and measured treatise on the state of the geopolitical realities. But don’t you feel rather alone — surrounded by all the sabre rattling, arrogance, denial, economic delusion, and brain-dead policy-lock?

    This is Eurasia uniting to keep America out, to trample American and Israeli interests, and to dominate geopolitics.

    I don’t know. I don’t think any of the Eurasian players really care about “trampling” America. Or Israel, for that matter. They are simply moving ahead and stepping over those who cannot get out of the way and continue to be a nuisance when they don’t really have the mojo (that a well educated and healthy populace might provide) to play an advanced game.

    Let me be clear: this is the systemic and complete failure of 40 years of American foreign and domestic policy.

    No kidding. Stick a fork in it. There’s no path to claw back from here. Just about all adversity currently facing the US is a direct result of, and response to, its utterly tonedeaf, short-sighted, and self-centered foreign policy.

    America — stripped by globalisation of her productive base, and thus dependent on Eurasian resources and manufacturing — is about to lose the colossal free lunch she has enjoyed since the 1970s.

    Really, since 1944, by my reckoning, when the dollar was bestowed with Reserve Currency status. But, when Nixon revoked its tie to gold in the early 70s, the US lost all self-control and succumbed to the terrible temptation to monetize its debt. The outcome is, of course, writ large in simple math and physics.

    The real problem is that the US simply does not have a charter that takes it into the 21st century the way that all other nations do. No doubt you’ve seen the recent controversy in the Times piece ‘We the People’ Loses Appeal With People Around the World:

    The United States Constitution is terse and old, and it guarantees relatively few rights…. the Constitution’s waning influence may be part of a general decline in American power and prestige.

    The rights guaranteed by the American Constitution are parsimonious by international standards, and they are frozen in amber. As Sanford Levinson wrote in 2006 in “Our Undemocratic Constitution,” “the U.S. Constitution is the most difficult to amend of any constitution currently existing in the world today.” (Yugoslavia used to hold that title, but Yugoslavia did not work out.)

    Other nations routinely trade in their constitutions wholesale, replacing them on average every 19 years. By odd coincidence, Thomas Jefferson, in a 1789 letter to James Madison, once said that every constitution “naturally expires at the end of 19 years” because “the earth belongs always to the living generation.” These days, the overlap between the rights guaranteed by the Constitution and those most popular around the world is spotty.

    …the Constitution is out of step with the rest of the world in failing to protect, at least in so many words, a right to travel, the presumption of innocence and entitlement to food, education and health care.

    The Constitution’s waning global stature is consistent with the diminished influence of the Supreme Court, which is losing the central role it once had among courts in modern democracies. Many foreign judges say they have become less likely to cite decisions of the United States Supreme Court, in part because of what they consider its parochialism.

    “America is in danger, I think, of becoming something of a legal backwater,” Justice Michael Kirby of the High Court of Australia said in a 2001 interview. He said that he looked instead to India, South Africa and New Zealand.

    The US constitution is the oldest written national constitution still in force anywhere in the world. (And, the shortest.) It’s not the right stuff for a nation that wants to compete and participate meaningfully in the world today.

    And, as far as I can tell, everybody knows that, except Americans.

    • Funny you should raise the NYT article. I am actually a huge fan of the US constitution. Granted, the founders believed that each generation should have its own compact, and certainly we live in a different world than 1776. But the other constitutions cited (e.g. Canada) are broader but shallower. I love how simple and terse and absolute the US constitution is. There is no balance, no discretion; you have these rights, and the government shall not violate them, and that’s the end of it. Other nations have wrapped themselves up in sophistry.

      I’d say a whole lot of America’s problems come out of abandoning the constitutional principles, for example in the area of monetary policy. Congress is supposed to coin money, and regulate the value thereof, not some shadowy NGO.

      • Thank you. I was thinking the same thing. All of our problems lie in not adhering to the Constitution, the 14th Amendment, Executive Orders, The Federal Reserve, ignoring George Washingtons’ farewell address, allowing foreigners and secret societies to dictate policy, and a million other things.

  5. long sighted intelligence here. an atoll of common sense. the US cartel will welcome a pakistani offense as an opening shot to war. in fact they manufacture both dissent and consent to do so. and they are full on waging the subjugation and occupation of the african continent already. not to mention that the other evil eye is on south america. fitful dreams of power in too many places. there are extenuating circumstances hidden beneath the surface as always but this time they are of a stature unknowable to us. the US cannot rebuild itself any longer, not without vast upheaval, a tearing down. this is born of lack of true vision. the cash is in the hands of the wealthy who only want more and live elsewhere. it is a blind state of affairs that sees a future in which only they reside with their serfs.

    my silent mantra is “the plans of mice and men oft do go astray”
    b

    • Yeah. It’s a very deep analogy. Americans should have listened to Ron Paul instead of booing him when he expounded the golden rule: do as to others as you would wish to be done to yourself. Ignoring the golden rule will be disastrous for America.

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